Category Archives: Boards and Commissions

Mayor and Council to Discuss Affordable Housing, Environment, and a $plash Pad

Fatal and serious injuries on the streets of Rockville, 2016-2020.

At its Monday, December 6, 2021 meeting, the Rockville Mayor and Council will discuss moderately priced housing (adding 30- to 99-year rent control periods); abandoning a “paper” street adjacent to 205 Mount Vernon Place in Hungerford; and allowing 350 apartments instead of offices in Fallsgrove. On the Consent Calendar (items approved without discussion) are a $322,364 splash pad for Maryvale Park (requested by the East Rockville Civic Association); a CDBG grant application to Montgomery County ($263,000 for the maintenance and repair of low-income housing); and letters to SHA (regarding traffic and pedestrian safety; most dangerous is the Rockville Pike) and WMATA (reduced service, access, and safety—can we all agree that WMATA has among the worst planners and project managers of any agency in the region?). The Mayor and Council will also receive reports from the Environment Commission and on an Employee Compensation and Classification Study (current salaries are generally competitive).

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Mayor and Council to Approve 370 Residences near King Farm with Unusual Conditions

Site plan for 300 new residential units at 16200 Frederick Road (King Buick) proposed by EYA.

At its Monday, November 8, 2021 meeting, the Rockville Mayor and Council will approve 370 residences at 16200 Frederick Road (aka King Buick), amend the City Code for “moderately priced housing”, and increase water and sewer rates starting in the second half of 2022. On the Consent Calendar (items approved without discussion) are a replacement shelter at Isreal Park, among others. The Mayor and Council will also receive a report from the Planning Commission.

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Mayor and Council to discuss 350 Multifamily Unit Development in Fallsgrove

Key West Center at Fallsgrove (Research Blvd and W. Gude Drive, Rockville).

At its Monday, November 1, 2021 meeting, the Rockville Mayor and Council will discuss board and commission appointments; water and sewer rates; and construction of 350 multifamily units in Fallsgrove. On the Consent Calendar (items approved without discussion) are no items. The Mayor and Council will also receive reports on cultural arts; bikeway and pedestrian master plans; and the 2022 state legislative priorities.

Key West Center Fallsgrove LLC is requesting permission to building up to 350 multifamily units on an undeveloped property at 1800 Research Boulevard. It is currently zoned for research-and-development offices, but they are requesting a change to residential use, exceed the number of apartments allowed in Fallsgrove, and exceed the building height restrictions. In addition, they are asking to retain the ability to construct an office, if market conditions change (“having their cake and icing, too”). The property is within the Richard Montgomery Cluster Area. According to a 2019 traffic study, the project will “not substantially alter or change the projected and approved vehicular traffic flow movements in and around the subject site.” The Planning Commission had twice approved projects for eight-story office buildings, but nothing was built.

More details in the 226-page agenda packet available at https://www.rockvillemd.gov/AgendaCenter/ViewFile/Agenda/_11012021-6394.

Planning Commission to Discuss Priorities for 2022-23

At its Wednesday, October 27, 2021 meeting, the Rockville Planning Commission will discuss implementation of the 2040 Comprehensive Plan. During the September 22 meeting, the Commission and staff recognized that development of a
complete implementation framework covering the entire Plan, including Commission discussions, would
not be possible to complete this fall; and that the Commission could continue to work on this framework
over the next approximately six months. The city staff will present a list of about 30 recommendations for the next year to implement the Plan and, should the Commission choose to do so, make a recommendation to the
Mayor and Council in time for their development of the Fiscal Year 2023 Budget, which would mean
delivering its recommendation during the fall of 2021.

Among the short-term recommendations for implementation are:

  • a comprehensive update to the Zoning Ordinance
  • update the Town Center Master Plan
  • enhancements to the pedestrian and bicycle safety and accessibility
  • identify and acquire properties for parks
  • complete the plan for Red Gate Park
  • identify a solution for the King Farm Farmstead
  • relocate the materials and distribution facility from North Stonestreet Avenue owned by MCPS and Montgomery County
  • complete a climate action plan
  • expand the number of charging stations for electric vehicles
  • prepare a flood resiliency plan
  • develop a marketing and branding plan to attract businesses and customers to Rockville
  • complete a strategic plan for affordable housing

That’s the short list from nearly 30 items suggested. It is far longer than reasonable to get anything significant accomplished in the next year. To get anything done, the Planning Commission will need to choose no more than three—and more importantly, they need to be the right things that will have a lasting and significant impact on the community. Which three would you choose?

More details in the 11-page agenda packet available at https://rockvillemd.gov/AgendaCenter/ViewFile/Agenda/_10272021-6389.

Rockville Mayor and Council to Discuss Taxes and Budget for Next Year

At its Monday, October 25, 2021 meeting, the Rockville Mayor and Council will discuss taxes for fiscal year 2022 and the budget calendar. On the Consent Calendar (items approved without discussion) are fees for public works and planning and develop services, among others. The Mayor and Council will also receive reports on the American Rescue Plan Acts funds, senior citizen commission update, and a proposed youth commission.

More details in the 184-page agenda packet available at https://www.rockvillemd.gov/AgendaCenter/ViewFile/Agenda/_10252021-6386.

Historic District Commission to Consider Multi-Unit Residences Downtown and in Twinbrook

22 W. Jefferson in downtown Rockville.

At its Thursday, October 21, 2021 meeting, the Rockville Historic District Commission will discuss conversion of an office building at 22 W. Jefferson into a multi-unit residential building and the demolition of 1800 and 1818 Chapman Avenue to construct a multi-unit residential building near Twinbrook Metro. On the Consent Calendar (items approved without discussion) are no items.

More details in the 3-page agenda packet available at https://www.rockvillemd.gov/AgendaCenter/ViewFile/Agenda/_10212021-6384

Sister City Endorses Kuan Lee for Council?

Facebook Lee Endorsement

Facebook post endorsing Kuan Lee for City Council.

The message on Facebook asked readers to “Please support our member Kuan Lee who is running for the City Council of Rockville. Also, please join/renew the Rockville Sister City Corporation (RSCC) membership to show your support.

What? Rockville Sister City is endorsing a candidate? Not only is RSCC part of the City of Rockville, it’s incorporated as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization—endorsing a candidate not only would sever its ties with the City but also jeopardize its status with the IRS.

RSCC President Drew Powell assured me that Rockville Sister City did NOT endorse Kuan Lee, nor would it endorse any candidate for elected office.  It remains confusing, however, because Kuan Lee is a member of the RSCC board, the Facebook post urges support for RSCC, and Drew Powell is a longtime vocal supporter of Bridget Newton, Lee’s campaign colleague. RSCC can’t control what other people say or imply about them, but I suspect they will have a heated discussion to sort this out and clarify their role in the election and this debacle at their next meeting.

In the meantime, a closer look reveals that the Facebook post was made by the Rockville-Yilan City Corporation. Never heard of it? It was incorporated in Maryland in 2017 by…wait for it…Kuan Lee and operates from his home in Rockville.  Yup, Kuan Lee endorsed himself in the disguise of a charitable organization.

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There are so many things wrong with this, but let’s just list a few that are most important to Rockville voters: Continue reading →

“Boards and Commission Task Force” Should be Taken to Task

Jack Kelly and Steven Van Grack, members of Rockville’s Boards and Commissions Task Force.

I’ve just returned from the Boards and Commissions Task Force meeting in Rockville City Hall tonight and was surprised by two things:

  1.  Although they lacked a quorum, they met for two hours to discuss a set of draft recommendations to reform the city’s boards and commissions.
  2. Two members of the task force openly endorsed Bridget Newton in the mayoral election (“I’ll be voting for her in the upcoming election”).

It seems ironic that a task force charged with reviewing and improving the city’s boards and commissions fails to follow some of the city’s and state’s existing policies and practices.  Can you imagine other city boards discussing business without a quorum? If members of the planning commission or environment commission expressed their support for their candidates during one of their business meetings?

They also distributed a “dashboard” with their assessment of the city’s boards and found that significant improvement is needed in:

  • diverse citizen input
  • consistent internal communication
  • a transparent and efficient process for identifying and appointing board and commission members
  • Mayor and Council and city staff providing productive advice and direction to boards and commissions

The dashboard also revealed that NO areas were acceptable; all fell short in achieving the city’s goals. Rockville’s boards and commissions are entirely composed of community volunteers so this poor rating across the board is especially frustrating.  How much worse does it need to become?

Despite these challenges, tonight’s discussion showed that the Task Force is reluctant to make any meaningful changes, especially in the process for identifying and appointing board and commission members. They admit there’s been a long-standing problem in filling vacancies, especially on Planning Commission and Historic District Commission, but are pleased to confine their tinkering to the edges, not at core—the exclusive power of the Mayor to nominate board and commission members. And yet, Mayor Newton is unwilling or unable to do her job—there are currently twenty-six (26!) vacancies (that’s more than five basketball teams). It seems we’ll be facing a civic version of insanity when their recommendations are released this fall: “keep trying the same thing expecting a different result.”

Here’s another kicker: the packet distributed at the meeting is not the same as what is available on the city website.  I’ve attached the packet so you can have a better sense of what was discussed. Their next meeting is Tuesday, July 30 at 6:30 pm in the Black-Eyed Susan Room at Rockville City Hall.

Rockville’s website shows 26 vacancies on its boards and commissions in July 2019 (this is just an excerpt).