Tag Archives: David Greene

Rockville Pike Traffic Solutions Appear Confusing, but 252′ Width Seems Right

Rockville Pike proposal for 252 feet.png

Rockville Planning Commission’s proposal for a 252′-wide ROW for the Rockville Pike.  It includes eight lanes for cars, two lanes for Bus Rapid Transit, four lanes for bikes, and two sidewalks for pedestrians along with landscaped medians and left-turn lanes.

On Monday, May 9, the Rockville Mayor and Council will continue its worksession on “Rockville’s Pike Neighborhood Plan.”  Along with building heights and pedestrian crossings, traffic congestion is a major controversy and the conversation has become terribly confusing:  widening or narrowing the road, keeping or eliminating the access roads, extending adjacent roads, increasing Metro service, and incorporating bus rapid transit (BRT).  Some of these solutions are beyond the control of the City (such as Metro service), some benefit one group versus another (such as businesses or nearby residents), and others are so expensive or far in the future that their feasibility is unclear (such as the BRT). What’s become incredibly confusing are Continue reading →

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What We Learned in the Blackout of Summer 2012

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It’s been a month since the powerful thunderstorm–a derecho to be specific–knocked out power to most of Rockville and the Mid-Atlantic.  But let’s call a spade a spade–it was a massive power outage, a blackout, during the hottest days of summer.  Most lost power for days, some for a week.  As we discovered, if you lose the internet, you’re back in 1979; if you lose electricity, you’re back in 1879.  Anger boiled over in the days that followed, but now it seems nearly forgotten.  Before our memories fade, what did we learn?  Here’s my list, culled from talking with neighbors, reading the newspapers, and scanning the listservs:

1.  Pepco doesn’t know your power is out unless you tell them.  Don’t assume they have some fancy computer system that notifies them automatically that you’ve lost power, assume that your neighbor has called, assume it’ll fix itself, or assume that they’re busy and you don’t want to trouble them (poor dears!).  Call them at 877-737-2662.  Write this number down and put it on your fridge–another power outage will occur and you’ll want this handy.  Many people said they called but Pepco thought their power had been restored, so call daily to ensure they have the correct information.  David Greene noted that he used his mobile phone to, “monitor the Pepco outage map, and they marked our power as restored several times during the week when it was not actually restored. I called them many times to get us back on their map.”

2.  Pepco prioritizes work based on the number of outages.  That makes sense–first tackle the jobs that will benefit the most people–if they have the correct information.  But if you and your neighbors don’t call Pepco, they will assume everything is okay (see #1 above).  You might want to visit your neighbors and check to see if they’ve called.

3.  If you have FIOS, your “landline” phone won’t work.  How disappointing to have the latest technology and discover it’s useless in a power outage.  My FIOS system came with a battery backup, but Continue reading →